Archive for the ‘Main Dishes’ Category

Mystery Recipe Monday- March 26, 2012

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Mstery Recipe Monday

Millet Dogs

I know Millet Dogs sounds very odd, but before you run away in fright, please allow me to explain.  One of Farmer Boy Charles’ favorite foods is that “Fair Food”  favorite the crunchy and delicious on-a-stick treat, the Corn Dog.  But lately we’ve noticed some less than desirous behaviors when Charles eats foods made from corn.  We are not sure if this is from the “gluten” in corn (aka corn protein… it really isn’t the same type of gluten as you find in wheat barley or rye.)  Or from the starches/sugars in the corn making the  overgrown yeast population in his gut “a little too happy”.  (Yeast eat startches and sugars, turning them into carbon dioxide, the lovely bubbles that make yeasted bread dough rise, and as their waste product of this digestion, they make alcohol (or what my high school microbiology teacher liked to call “yeast pee-pee”.)  The alcohol can be a wonderful by-product if for example you are brewing beer, making hard cider or fermenting wine… but a bad by-product if there are a huge population on them in your 8 year old child’s gut, making him act like a goofy drunk every time he ties on a meal heavy in carbs.  We don’t know which is the problem for Charles, but we decided to take him completely off corn for 1 month and then do a challenge test to see how he’s handling it.  The goal with this is to see if we are going to need to remove corn permenantly from the family diet or not.

In order to keep life as normal as possible and keep one of the few protein delivery devices we have in Charles’ diet, Pioneer Pa  devised the following recipe, which substitutes coarsely ground millet flour for fine cornmeal.

Millet Dogs (Baked NOT Fried… a healthier version of Fair Food!)

You will need: 1 medium sized mixing bowl, a whisk or wooden spoon for stirring, small ladle or serving spoon (for pouring batter into cooking device), bamboo skewers (may be cut in 1/2 for shorter sticks) and a Corn Dog R (this is an electric cooking device, similar to a waffle iron that makes corn dogs and similar foods… we actually baked brownies in ours once but that is a story for another day.  A Corn Dog R can be purchased for about $25 from www.amazon.com by typing corn dog maker into the search in the kitchen section.  It’s worth the investment if you have a family with young kids who like “resturant” type foods).  See pictures below of our Corn Dog R:

Ingredients:

1 cup Millet Flour (white or red will both work equally well, the white will make a more “yellow” corn dog looking millet dog.  Millet Flour is usually a little coarse and mealy like conrmeal)

1/2 cup white rice flour

1/2 cup soy flour (or sweet sorghum flour if you are avoiding soy.  We use soy to get more protein into our very picky  eater Charles)

2 tsp. sugar

2 tsp. non-aluminum baking powder

1 tsp salt

1 tsp Xanthan Gum

2  large eggs (or equivalent of egg replacer)

1 TBSP Olive or Canola Oil

1 to 1 1/2 cups water or “milk” substitute (this really depends on how dry your flour is.  You are looking for a pancake batter type consistancy here. Tips from Ma: We’ve used the cooking water from making steamed veg like broccoli and such before to add some extra vitamins and minerals before or added 2 to 4 oz of pureed baby food veggies like peas or green beans for part of the liquid in the batter, because Charles will not willingly eat vegetables except for pumpkin (baked in bread or pies) and tomato- based sauces… thus we usually have to hide veggies in other foods.)

1 pkg of your favorite brand of GF/CF Hot Dogs (remember to read your labels)

Pam-type spray oil for oiling the Corn Dog R to prevent stickage

Instructions:

1. Plug in Corn Dog R to heat up.

2. In your mixing bowl stir together dry ingredients until well blended

3. Beat eggs until they appear “scrambled”.

4. Add eggs and oil to dry mixture and blend well.

5.  Add liquids (veg. puree first if using, then water or milk) a little at a time, stirring between additions until the pancake batter like consistancy is reached.

6. Cut hot dogs in 1/2 so they will fit in the baking wells of the Corn Dog R.

7. Spray the hot, ready to use Corn Dog R with spray oil, coating well to prevent sticking.

8.  Using a large spoon or small ladle, fill the bottom portion of the cooking wells in the Corn Dog R with batter.

9. Place 1/2 hotdog in each well and spoon a little of the batter mixture over the top of the hot dogs.

10. Close the lid.  Slide in the skewer sticks, there is a little hole in the side of each well where the sticks go in after the machine is closed.

11.  Wait for the light to come on indicating the millet dogs are done.  If they aren’t quite as browned as you like, you can close it again and keep cooking another minute or two, before removing them.

12. When Millet Dogs are done, either plate up individual plates or place on a platter to serve family style.  Serve with your favorite condiments.  Baked Sweet Potato Fries or Baked Green Beans make a lovely complimenting side dish.

Allow leftovers  to cool.  Place in freezer safe zipper bags and freeze.  These are easily frozen and warmed up again using the microwave.  These make great quick suppers on the run, after-school snacks or can be packed in the lunch box of your school aged children and so forth.  We often make a double batch of them and freeze a bunch on the weekend for later use… we like to call that DIY Gluten Free Convience Food!

(*Pioneer Pa is the keeper and guru of electric cooking appliances at our house… seriously I burn stuff so easily using small electric appliances that when our last toaster died I refused to get another one and dug the toaster oven out of the camper and brought that in the house… I totally manage to burn stuff in a crockpot… give me a  wood or gas range anyday!)

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Someday this old wood-fired range will be returned to where it belongs, in my home. The previous homeowner of our farm removed it from the house and placed it out in the shop building for storage.  I can’t wait to bring it back, as I learned to cook on this type of appliance (though not nearly this fancy) while living off-grid on my father’s ranch in the mountains of Eastern Washington.

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